Comparing Short Term Care to Long Term Care Insurance.

Posted on Posted in Long-Term Care

Long-term-care

What is Long Term Care? Almost 70% of people turning 65 will need long term care at some point in their lives. Long term care is when we need help with two or more daily activities such as bathing, dressing, eating or using the bathroom. (i)  Care can be provided in a nursing home, assisted care facility or at home.

Costs vary depending on whether the care is provided in our home, in an assisted living facility or nursing home.  (Here is a helpful link to look up the cost of care in your area.) You’ll see nursing home costs are about double that of home care.

Doesn’t Medicare Pay These Costs?  Don’t count on it. Part A covers skilled nursing care in a skilled nursing facility (not home care) under certain conditions for a limited time; and even then it’s usually related to a hospital stay and discharge.  (ii)  And, no, Medicare does not cover long term or custodial care. (iii)

So, How Would I Pay for This?

In the U.S., 10,000 people turn 65 daily. Most do not have the financial reserves or long term care insurance    protection against what could wipe out your lifetime of savings and accumulated assets.   Why not? Well,the three reasons why people defer obtaining a long term care policy are:

  1. The cost. Let’s face it, traditional long term care premiums can be pricey. Not as expensive as one year of care but beyond what many middle age household budgets can afford.  (Paying off mortgage, college education(s), retirement funds, etc.)
  2. Denial. “I am not part of the 70% that will need care.”  “My children will take care of me.” “I have good genes.”
  3. Complexity.   Underwriting for eligibility can involve extensive medical forms, physician statements, lab results and pharmacy screens to confirm eligibility.  (Download FREE Shopper’s Guide to Long Term Care Insurance target=”_blank” )

And So How Does Short Term Compare to Long Term Care Protection?

 Short Term Care

  • Benefits paid for up to one year
  • A 20 to 60 day waiting period
  • No Plan of Care Required
  • Simple Application
  • More Affordable
 Long Term Care

  • Benefits paid for up to ten years
  • A 90 to 365 waiting period
  • Yes, a Plan of Care Is Required
  • Extensive Application
  • More Expensive

Next Step

Call me at (518) 346-2115 and we can review the 10 Yes /No eligibility questions and create your customized premium quote.

Please visit and follow our Facebook Page. Daniel G. Alcorn, a licensed and independent agent, represents licensed insurance companies in Massachusetts and New York.  Dan may receive compensation for individual enrollments in Medicare Advantage, Medicare Supplemental Insurance , Medicare Prescription Drug or Long Term Care /Short Term Care plans.
Sources:

(i) http://longtermcare.gov/the-basics/what-is-long-term-care/

(ii) http://www.medicare.gov/coverage/skilled-nursing-facility-care.html

(iii) http://www.medicare.gov/what-medicare-covers/not-covered/item-and-services-not-covered-by-part-a-and-b.html

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